Audrey Tautou by Joe McGorty

“Never confuse a photograph of a beautiful woman with a beautiful photograph.”

There are a handful of actresses that I find truly enchanting. Some are beautiful, others are quirky, and still others are intriguing for reasons I can’t quite define or explain. French actress Audrey Tautou is very near the top of that list, for all of the reasons I mentioned, and more. Like many of you, I first saw her in the remarkable Jean-Pierre Jeunet film, Amelie. I was already a fan of Juenet’s previous films Delicatessen and City of Lost Children (which features the always amazing Ron Perlmen), but Amelie was something different, due in large part by the dazzling performance by Audrey Tautou in the title role. 

Photographer Joe McGorty shot a gorgeous set of photographs of Audrey Tautou, including the cover, for Glass magazine. What amazed me about the photos, beyond how absolutely luminous Ms. Tautou looks, is how simple the setup is. We don’t talk alot about gear on F+B, but I wanted to share this set and highlight the fact that there is, in fact, very little gear used to make these gorgeous photographs. Granted, McGorty is shooting on large format film, but, in terms of lighting, most of the shots use only window light, with a few adding a K5600 Softube as a fill. The point is, there’s nothing crazy complicated about the equipment, but rather, it’s the experience and vision of the photographer that is really what makes these beautiful shots. Notice also how McGorty created a “mood board” prior to the shoot, that provided a visual reference or blueprint as to what sort of look and feel he was going for. Now, of course having a beautiful model and an amazing location obviously help, but without the photographer knowing what to do with the model and the space, the shots simply wouldn’t have worked as well as they do.

Joe McGorty - Audrey Tatou - Glass Magazine

Joe McGorty - Audrey Tatou - Glass Magazine

Joe McGorty - Audrey Tatou - Glass Magazine

Joe McGorty - Audrey Tatou - Moodboard - BTS
[via Behance]