Trading Paint For Polygons: Zsolt Ekho Farkas
On first glance you may be tempted to think that the image above is that of a painting, specifically the 19th-century painting, Budavár Visszavétele by Benczúr Gyula. However, what you are actually looking at is a remarkably detailed 3D recreation of Gyula’s 19th-century masterpiece, painstakingly modeled, rigged, textured and rendered by Hungarian artist, Zsolt Ekho Farkas. The 8.5 million polygon scene depicts Budapest’s recapture as Ottoman forces invade and required that Farkas – after analyzing the painting to determine where the characters would be in 3D space –  had to create digital models of all of the elements in the scene. Lights were placed in 3D space to cast the appropriate shadows, and subtle wisps of smoke were added to bring additional depth and atmosphere to the overall scene.

Budavár visszavétele 3D from ekho on Vimeo.

Trading Paint For Polygons: Zsolt Ekho Farkas

On first glance you may be tempted to think that the image above is that of a painting, specifically the 19th-century painting, Budavár Visszavétele by Benczúr Gyula. However, what you are actually looking at is a remarkably detailed 3D recreation of Gyula’s 19th-century masterpiece, painstakingly modeled, rigged, textured and rendered by Hungarian artist, Zsolt Ekho Farkas. The 8.5 million polygon scene depicts Budapest’s recapture as Ottoman forces invade and required that Farkas – after analyzing the painting to determine where the characters would be in 3D space –  had to create digital models of all of the elements in the scene. Lights were placed in 3D space to cast the appropriate shadows, and subtle wisps of smoke were added to bring additional depth and atmosphere to the overall scene.

Budavár visszavétele 3D from ekho on Vimeo.

On Taking Pictures #102: Rigging the Roulette Wheel
Big Q&A show this week as we attempt to tackle some of your questions from the Google+ Community. We got some great questions on process, intent and even the business side of creativity. Danny Lyon is our Photographer of the Week.

Read the show notes

On Taking Pictures #102: Rigging the Roulette Wheel

Big Q&A show this week as we attempt to tackle some of your questions from the Google+ Community. We got some great questions on process, intent and even the business side of creativity. Danny Lyon is our Photographer of the Week.

Read the show notes

Forgiveness And Mercy In Rwanda
In 1994, more than 800,000 people were killed in the Rwandan Genocide, a period of massive violence between the Hutus and the Tutsis that lasted 100 days. Recently, photographer Pieter Hugo visited southern Rwanda to capture an incredible series of photographs – portraits of the oppressed and their oppressors 20 years after the brutal conflict that left some two million Hutu refugees without a home as they fled their country for what was then called Zaire. The photographs are poignant reminders that humanity’s capacity for violence is often trumped by our capacity for compassion.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
Forgiveness And Mercy In Rwanda
In 1994, more than 800,000 people were killed in the Rwandan Genocide, a period of massive violence between the Hutus and the Tutsis that lasted 100 days. Recently, photographer Pieter Hugo visited southern Rwanda to capture an incredible series of photographs – portraits of the oppressed and their oppressors 20 years after the brutal conflict that left some two million Hutu refugees without a home as they fled their country for what was then called Zaire. The photographs are poignant reminders that humanity’s capacity for violence is often trumped by our capacity for compassion.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
Forgiveness And Mercy In Rwanda
In 1994, more than 800,000 people were killed in the Rwandan Genocide, a period of massive violence between the Hutus and the Tutsis that lasted 100 days. Recently, photographer Pieter Hugo visited southern Rwanda to capture an incredible series of photographs – portraits of the oppressed and their oppressors 20 years after the brutal conflict that left some two million Hutu refugees without a home as they fled their country for what was then called Zaire. The photographs are poignant reminders that humanity’s capacity for violence is often trumped by our capacity for compassion.
Read the full post
Zoom Info

Forgiveness And Mercy In Rwanda

In 1994, more than 800,000 people were killed in the Rwandan Genocide, a period of massive violence between the Hutus and the Tutsis that lasted 100 days. Recently, photographer Pieter Hugo visited southern Rwanda to capture an incredible series of photographs – portraits of the oppressed and their oppressors 20 years after the brutal conflict that left some two million Hutu refugees without a home as they fled their country for what was then called Zaire. The photographs are poignant reminders that humanity’s capacity for violence is often trumped by our capacity for compassion.

Read the full post

Five For Friday #103
We made it just under the wire with this week’s Five For Friday. In it, you’ll find moving photojournalism from photographer Kim Thue, a fascinating short film from Jeffrey Karoff called Cave Digger and some brilliant portraits of orangutans by Ernest Goh. Share it before you turn in and have a great and creative weekend.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
Five For Friday #103
We made it just under the wire with this week’s Five For Friday. In it, you’ll find moving photojournalism from photographer Kim Thue, a fascinating short film from Jeffrey Karoff called Cave Digger and some brilliant portraits of orangutans by Ernest Goh. Share it before you turn in and have a great and creative weekend.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
Five For Friday #103
We made it just under the wire with this week’s Five For Friday. In it, you’ll find moving photojournalism from photographer Kim Thue, a fascinating short film from Jeffrey Karoff called Cave Digger and some brilliant portraits of orangutans by Ernest Goh. Share it before you turn in and have a great and creative weekend.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
Five For Friday #103
We made it just under the wire with this week’s Five For Friday. In it, you’ll find moving photojournalism from photographer Kim Thue, a fascinating short film from Jeffrey Karoff called Cave Digger and some brilliant portraits of orangutans by Ernest Goh. Share it before you turn in and have a great and creative weekend.
Read the full post
Zoom Info

Five For Friday #103

We made it just under the wire with this week’s Five For Friday. In it, you’ll find moving photojournalism from photographer Kim Thue, a fascinating short film from Jeffrey Karoff called Cave Digger and some brilliant portraits of orangutans by Ernest Goh. Share it before you turn in and have a great and creative weekend.

Read the full post

New York Bike Style [Review]
I was in Portland last week and one of the things that I couldn’t help but notice was that cities and bicycles go together like peas and carrots – well some cities anyway. I live in the suburbs outside of Los Angeles and here, people use bicycles for exercise or recreation, not transportation. Actually, even if you go into LA, you typically don’t see too many bikes, which is not really surprising, since the city is so spread out. You see bikes at the beach, but there again, recreation not transportation. In Portland, bikes are everywhere and the people that ride them come in all shapes, sizes and manners of dress. It’s the same with San Francisco to a certain extent, except for the hills – if you can make it all the way up California Street in one go you have my utmost respect. All this aside, the top of the bicycle-city heap (at least in the U.S.) has to be New York City where, while cabs are still king, bike culture (or is it couture?) is riding a close second and has become equal parts transportation and lifestyle accessory.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
New York Bike Style [Review]
I was in Portland last week and one of the things that I couldn’t help but notice was that cities and bicycles go together like peas and carrots – well some cities anyway. I live in the suburbs outside of Los Angeles and here, people use bicycles for exercise or recreation, not transportation. Actually, even if you go into LA, you typically don’t see too many bikes, which is not really surprising, since the city is so spread out. You see bikes at the beach, but there again, recreation not transportation. In Portland, bikes are everywhere and the people that ride them come in all shapes, sizes and manners of dress. It’s the same with San Francisco to a certain extent, except for the hills – if you can make it all the way up California Street in one go you have my utmost respect. All this aside, the top of the bicycle-city heap (at least in the U.S.) has to be New York City where, while cabs are still king, bike culture (or is it couture?) is riding a close second and has become equal parts transportation and lifestyle accessory.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
New York Bike Style [Review]
I was in Portland last week and one of the things that I couldn’t help but notice was that cities and bicycles go together like peas and carrots – well some cities anyway. I live in the suburbs outside of Los Angeles and here, people use bicycles for exercise or recreation, not transportation. Actually, even if you go into LA, you typically don’t see too many bikes, which is not really surprising, since the city is so spread out. You see bikes at the beach, but there again, recreation not transportation. In Portland, bikes are everywhere and the people that ride them come in all shapes, sizes and manners of dress. It’s the same with San Francisco to a certain extent, except for the hills – if you can make it all the way up California Street in one go you have my utmost respect. All this aside, the top of the bicycle-city heap (at least in the U.S.) has to be New York City where, while cabs are still king, bike culture (or is it couture?) is riding a close second and has become equal parts transportation and lifestyle accessory.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
New York Bike Style [Review]
I was in Portland last week and one of the things that I couldn’t help but notice was that cities and bicycles go together like peas and carrots – well some cities anyway. I live in the suburbs outside of Los Angeles and here, people use bicycles for exercise or recreation, not transportation. Actually, even if you go into LA, you typically don’t see too many bikes, which is not really surprising, since the city is so spread out. You see bikes at the beach, but there again, recreation not transportation. In Portland, bikes are everywhere and the people that ride them come in all shapes, sizes and manners of dress. It’s the same with San Francisco to a certain extent, except for the hills – if you can make it all the way up California Street in one go you have my utmost respect. All this aside, the top of the bicycle-city heap (at least in the U.S.) has to be New York City where, while cabs are still king, bike culture (or is it couture?) is riding a close second and has become equal parts transportation and lifestyle accessory.
Read the full post
Zoom Info

New York Bike Style [Review]

I was in Portland last week and one of the things that I couldn’t help but notice was that cities and bicycles go together like peas and carrots – well some cities anyway. I live in the suburbs outside of Los Angeles and here, people use bicycles for exercise or recreation, not transportation. Actually, even if you go into LA, you typically don’t see too many bikes, which is not really surprising, since the city is so spread out. You see bikes at the beach, but there again, recreation not transportation. In Portland, bikes are everywhere and the people that ride them come in all shapes, sizes and manners of dress. It’s the same with San Francisco to a certain extent, except for the hills – if you can make it all the way up California Street in one go you have my utmost respect. All this aside, the top of the bicycle-city heap (at least in the U.S.) has to be New York City where, while cabs are still king, bike culture (or is it couture?) is riding a close second and has become equal parts transportation and lifestyle accessory.

Read the full post

On Taking Pictures #101: Cookie Cutter Wisdom
This week, we discuss authenticity – is the quest for authenticity real or just a hoax perpetuated by hipsters and organic farmers? Also, thoughts on Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art – realizing what you are and getting down to business. Could this book be a good candidate for a group discussion? Plus, Lee Friedlander is our Photographer of the Week.

Read the show notes

On Taking Pictures #101: Cookie Cutter Wisdom

This week, we discuss authenticity – is the quest for authenticity real or just a hoax perpetuated by hipsters and organic farmers? Also, thoughts on Steven Pressfield’s The War of Art – realizing what you are and getting down to business. Could this book be a good candidate for a group discussion? Plus, Lee Friedlander is our Photographer of the Week.

Read the show notes

The Beauty Of Things Born Again: Sebastião Salgado

“I tell a little bit of my life to them, and they tell a little of theirs to me. The picture itself is just the tip of the iceberg.” – Sebastião Salgado

Have you ever encountered someone so fascinating or engaging that you can’t even begin to describe them? That is exactly how I felt when I first came across Sebastião Salgado. Considered to be one of the most influential photographers alive today, Salgado’s images are both powerful and compelling. But, it isn’t just his photography that makes him such an important figure; it is the way he has used his work to change the world.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
The Beauty Of Things Born Again: Sebastião Salgado

“I tell a little bit of my life to them, and they tell a little of theirs to me. The picture itself is just the tip of the iceberg.” – Sebastião Salgado

Have you ever encountered someone so fascinating or engaging that you can’t even begin to describe them? That is exactly how I felt when I first came across Sebastião Salgado. Considered to be one of the most influential photographers alive today, Salgado’s images are both powerful and compelling. But, it isn’t just his photography that makes him such an important figure; it is the way he has used his work to change the world.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
The Beauty Of Things Born Again: Sebastião Salgado

“I tell a little bit of my life to them, and they tell a little of theirs to me. The picture itself is just the tip of the iceberg.” – Sebastião Salgado

Have you ever encountered someone so fascinating or engaging that you can’t even begin to describe them? That is exactly how I felt when I first came across Sebastião Salgado. Considered to be one of the most influential photographers alive today, Salgado’s images are both powerful and compelling. But, it isn’t just his photography that makes him such an important figure; it is the way he has used his work to change the world.
Read the full post
Zoom Info
The Beauty Of Things Born Again: Sebastião Salgado

“I tell a little bit of my life to them, and they tell a little of theirs to me. The picture itself is just the tip of the iceberg.” – Sebastião Salgado

Have you ever encountered someone so fascinating or engaging that you can’t even begin to describe them? That is exactly how I felt when I first came across Sebastião Salgado. Considered to be one of the most influential photographers alive today, Salgado’s images are both powerful and compelling. But, it isn’t just his photography that makes him such an important figure; it is the way he has used his work to change the world.
Read the full post
Zoom Info

The Beauty Of Things Born Again: Sebastião Salgado

“I tell a little bit of my life to them, and they tell a little of theirs to me. The picture itself is just the tip of the iceberg.” – Sebastião Salgado

Have you ever encountered someone so fascinating or engaging that you can’t even begin to describe them? That is exactly how I felt when I first came across Sebastião Salgado. Considered to be one of the most influential photographers alive today, Salgado’s images are both powerful and compelling. But, it isn’t just his photography that makes him such an important figure; it is the way he has used his work to change the world.

Read the full post